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the IBIT Travel Digest 12.21.14

The good, the bad and the bizarre in the world of travel


EDITORIAL

DUMP THE TRADE EMBARGO AGAINST CUBA? NOT YET!

That’s right, I said it!

Last week’s surprise announcement that the United States and Cuba are normalizing their relations raises the prospect that the half-century-old trade embargo that blocks American travelers from freely visiting the island might disappear.

Since 2009, IBIT has advocated exactly that right here on this blog.

So now that it finally seems possible, why am I changing my mind? I’m not…really. But insofar as tourism is concerned, it might be in Cuba’s best interest not to see the embargo go away right away.

If you listen closely to the buzz in the travelsphere since Washington and Havana made their big splash, a common theme emerges:

“I better visit Cuba soon before the Americans get their en masse…and ruin it.”

We know where this comes from. Mass-market tourism may do great things for a nation’s economy, but it also can have a corrosive effect on a nation’s culture.

Greatly impoverished over the decades, in no small part because of the embargo, many aspects of Cuban life seem to have been frozen in time — and it’s not just the 1950s vintage cars that Cubans somehow keep running because they can’t get new ones from Detroit.

An influx of cash from a fresh wave of tourism could help modernize the island and its crumbling infrastructure.

That same wave, however, could leave Cuba looking like a living caricature of itself, a Hiltonized, Disneyfied, golden-arched version of Cuba, its culture diluted to the point that Cubans don’t recognize their own country anymore. A theme park where a nation used to be.

And that would be a shame.

But if the impending tidal wave of mass-market tourism from the US presents a challenge to Cuba’s physical environment and cultural integrity, it also presents an opportunity.

Cuba is in a position to develop a new kind of 21st century tourism, one that’s financially profitable, environmentally sustainable and culturally respectful. If it succeeds, it could — dare I say it? — revolutionize tourism worldwide.

It will take a shared commitment by the Cuban government, those of us in the travel industry and the Cuban people themselves to make that happen.

Keeping a loosened trade embargo in place could give all concerned the breathing room they need to formulate that concept, and put it in place.

Just in time to absorb a tsunami of American visitors.

So yeah, I still want to see the embargo go away. Just tap the brakes lightly for a year or two.

-0-

AFRICA’S OWN OLYMPICS
Among the Maasai people of East Africa, the title of “warrior” is neither symbolic nor ceremonial. It’s real. And you earn it by hunting and killing a lion, with a traditional Maasai spear.

That’s one reality. The other is that between loss of habitat, poaching, poisoning and traditional hunts, Africa’s lion population has been cut in half over the last half-century.

Result: the African lion are officially listed as “vulnerable” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. That puts it three steps from extinction in the wild.

If you’re the Maasai, what do you do? Well, you’re the Maasai community in Kenya, you hit “Reset” on your tradition.

The result is the Maasai Olympics, a biennial event held recently at Kimana Sanctuary in Kajiado, at the foot of Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa’s highest peak.

Here, the hunt is for medals, not lions.

The events are based on traditional Maasai tests of strength, skill and stamina, held at three levels — local, regional and throughout the famed Amboseli-Tsavo ecosystem, on Kenya’s southern border with Tanzania.

Included in the Maasai Olympics is an education program designed to move the Maasai away from lion hunting.

I don’t know if any thought is being given to eventually including Tanzania’s Maasai community in these events, but wouldn’t it be great if they did? Perhaps the two countries could alternate as hosts every two years.

This is something to be encouraged.

I’m pretty sure the lions wouldn’t mind.

-0-

And now, here’s The Digest:

AIR

from USA Today
What your choice of airline seat says about you, at least according to Expedia. VIDEO

from USA Today
The Etihad Airbus A380 double-decker jumbo jet. Suite dreams are made of this…and no, that’s not auto-correct.

LAND

from Travel Weekly
The UN’s World Tourism Organization predicting a record year for tourism worldwide, with North America being the strongest draw.

from USA Today
Want to get away…from your smartphone, your tablet and all the rest of your digital balls and chains? Six great places around the world to unwind, and unplug. SLIDESHOW

from the New York Times
Call it ski mountaineering, or Alpine touring or whatever else. This is old-school skiing, the way they did it before chairlifts and comfy lodges. You earn that downhill thrill.

from About.Travel
Five ways to pack lighter.

SEA

from USA Today
The best destinations to get your river cruise on in 2015, or so say these guys.

FOOD & DRINK

from USA Today
Want to spice up your annual Christmas feast — and maybe turn it into a global cultural experience at the same time? Get some recipe ideas from these holiday dishes from around the world. Season’s eatings!

from The Guardian (London UK)
Just what my holiday diet needs, an edible Christmas tree. Danke sehr, Dresden!

from SFGate (sponsored article)
A taste of Macau, where Chinese cooking meets the flavors of Portugal.

from The Guardian (London UK)
Singapore’s top 10 restaurants — presuming you can tear yourself away from the city’s famous food courts.

from USA Today
Know what a Reveillon is? You’ll have to go to New Orleans during the Christmas holidays to find out. Your tastebuds will thank you, profusely, later.

-0-

AFRICA

from The Guardian (London UK)
Christmas in Ethiopia. They celebrate theirs on Jan. 7, and they do it in some of the world’s most cherished UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including the rock churches of Lalibela.

from The Guardian (London UK)
South Africa’s budget beach escapes.

from IPPMedia
A novel idea being floated in Tanzania — turning the former camps of Africa’s anti-colonialism guerrillas into tourist attractions. Several, apparently, already are drawing visitors.

from eTurbo News
City tourism is important for East Africa. Nairobi and Kigali are two cities with ready-made attractions for foreign visitors.

AMERICAS

from The Guardian (London UK)
For those who can, or simply choose to, travel freely to Cuba right now: vacation apartments in Havana.

from USA Today
Bar hopping in Puerto Rico. The bars are called chinchorros. Good beats. Good eats. Cheap beer and air-conditioning. from The Guardian (London UK)
Oakland… Brooklyn West? Yes, that Oakland, as in Oakland, CA. It’s becoming — dare I say it? — hip. That’s right, I said it. Even on the other side of “the pond,” they’re starting to recognize.

from The Guardian (London UK)
Now here’s an idea I could get behind globally. Jakes Hotel, one of Jamaica’s more popular destination hotels on Treasure Beach, opens up a hostel right next door? Cool.

from The Guardian (London UK)
Long before it became a well-known brand of outdoor gear, Patagonia was a land of stark, rugged and spectacular beauty shared by Chile and Argentina. It still is.

ASIA/PACIFIC

from the New York Times
Thailand’s “Gong Highway.”

from The Guardian (London UK)
In Thailand, eco-tourism — highlighted by village homestays — is leading a comeback of the coastal regions devastated by the 2004 tsunami.

EUROPE

from the New York Times
How to spend a weekend in Strasbourg, the capital of France’s Alsace region. A treat any time of year, but an absolute joy at Christmastime. Half-French, half-German, wholly delightful. http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/21/travel/things-to-do-in-36-hours-in-strasbourg-france.html?ref=travel

from the New York Times
Ireland on the cheap, thanks to Dublin’s public transit.

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