We are apologize for the inconvenience but you need to download
more modern browser in order to be able to browse our page

Download Safari
Download Safari
Download Chrome
Download Chrome
Download Firefox
Download Firefox
Download IE 10+
Download IE 10+

The IBIT Travel Digest 7.7.13

The good, the bad and the bizarre in the world of travel

cropped-IMG_2218.jpg

THE PERFECT AIRPORT
As travelers, we complain a lot about airports, usually for good reason.

Too big. Too small. Too crowded. Too much distance between gates. Not enough seats in the departure halls. Not enough electric outlets to charge all our personal electronics.

what you ever thought about what you’d really like to see in an airport — other than the dissolution of the TSA, perhaps — that would make your travels easier and more comfortable?

And if you have thought about that question, what would your answer be?

The folks at Skyscanner, which devotes most of its efforts to letting travelers look up cheap flights online, decided to find out. So they surveyed 10,000 travelers and asked them what amenity they most wanted in an airport.

Of their top three answers, a library was third, sleeping pods were second — and the one most often suggested was…a movie theater.

Did you see that one coming? I sure didn’t.

You can see the rest of the results in this ABC News item here.

What would be the top three amenities in YOUR dream airport? Tell us in a comment!

-0-

BUY A BIKE, SAVE A LIFE
The Japanese know a thing or two about strength, versatility and all-around usefulness of bamboo. So do Africans, who are building bicycle frames with it.

So it only makes sense for Zambia’s bamboo bike makers to sell their bikes in Japan — and with the encouragement of the Japanese, they’re doing it.

The Japanese are getting the newest idea in modern bike construction, using a natural, ancient material with which they’re well familiar. The employees at Zambikes are making enough money to feed themselves and their families.

You can read about it in this story from the Japan Daily Press here.

As regular IBIT readers already know, Africa is getting serious about cycling, and has its own small cottage industry going with the production of bamboo bikes. IBIT would love to see this catch on in the United States.

Bamboo just might be the ideal material for bicycle frames — light, very strong, with the stiffness you need to generate power but able to soak up road shocks. And bamboo is a natural, sustainable material.

What’s not to like?

For more of this topic, see “Africa gets her roll on:”
Part 1
Part 2

-0-

CUTTING IN LINE
There are several reasons I tend to avoid major travel in summer, and one of the biggest is having to queue up in long lines.

You know the drill. At the airport to check in. At the major attractions to get in. At your hotel to check out. Here a line, there a line, everywhere a line stretching out the door or halfway to the horizon.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t take vacations to exercise my patience. And neither, apparently, do the folks at Smarter Travel.

They’ve come up with a handy list of suggestions for how to jump ahead of the lines — ethically.

In some instances, it’s simply a matter of due diligence,i.e., printing out your boarding passes early or signing up for an airline or rental car loyalty program. In most other cases, you literally will have to pay for the privilege.

Either way, it figures to save you a lot of time, and when you travel, saving time is as important as saving money.

Put it another way: You didn’t spend all that money to fly to Paris to stand in line to see the Louvre, did you?

-0-

LUXURY PARIS HOTEL GOES DARK
Travel Weekly is reporting than the Hotel de Crillon in Paris has closed for a two-year renovation.

If you’ve ever seen the inside of this place in the last ten years or so, you may well wonder what on Earth they need to renovate. The Crillon, sitting on the Place de la Concorde across the street from the US Embassy, has been a 5-star hotel virtually from the day it opened its doors.

Still, when you’re hosting people in a building that first went up in 1758, you need to do a few upgrades now and again.

Fear not, however. The Crillon is due to reopen in 2015. If you happen to be in Paris then, stop by and check it out.

And prepare to be impressed.

-0-

AND FINALLY…
If you’re feeling a fear of flying surging (or resurging) within you following yesterday’s crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco, a little perspective.

I took my first commercial airline flight in 1964. Had this crash occurred back then, we’d be talking about two survivors, not two deaths.

Commercial airliners are vastly better designed and built now than they were “back in the day.” Airports are far better prepared to handle major emergencies. The first responders have much better equipment and training. And mutual aid in a major incident is not a bureaucratic wrangle, but a foregone conclusion.

All of those elements came into play on behalf of Flight 214.

Okay? Now, smoke this over: Yesterday’s crash was the first fatal incident involving an airliner in the United States in 12 years. We can’t go 12 hours in this country without a fatal car crash. You going to give up driving?

Didn’t think so.

And now, here’s The Digest:

AIR
from the Associated Press via Yahoo!
Good news for frequent JetBlue fliers: Your loyalty points will no longer expire.

from Travel Weekly
American Airlines is experimenting with a new boarding procedure: Passengers with no carry-on bags get to board first.

from the Washington Post
Airlines are looking to create custom airfares specifically for you as an individual traveler, based on what the airline knows about you. A good thing or a way to keep you from searching out the best price yourself? Travel consumer advocate Christopher Elliott weighs in. Pay attention.

LAND
from BBC Travel
Five cities around the world where you can live large while spending small. Side-by-side comparisons to similar but pricier cities.

from Budget Travel
How to save money when using your cellphone abroad.

from Budget Travel
The world’s ten most visited cities.

SEA
from Travel Weekly
Royal Caribbean’s Oasis of the Seas, one of the two largest cruise ships afloat, will take a month’s leave of the Caribbean next year for a month of cruises in European and Mediterranean waters, including two Atlantic crossings, one in each direction.

FOOD & DRINK
from the Los Angeles Times
All aboard the Jose Cuervo Express. Next stop: Tequila.

from the Los Angeles Times
If you don’t have to rush back to work or school right after Labor Day, consider dropping in on a serious food and wine festival in Hawaii.

-0-

AFRICA
from Travel Weekly
When it comes to natural wonders, there’s more to Rwanda than its famed mountain gorillas.

from The Star (Kenya) via allAfrica.com
Kenya sets out to lure tourists from Morocco.

from the Tanzania Daily News via allAfrica.com
In the wake of President Barack Obama’s visit, Tanzanian business figures conclude the country needs more high-end hotels.

AMERICAS
from the New York Times
A once-seedy Philadephia street gets a hipster makeover. Out with the check-cashing joints and adult bookstores. In with the restaurants and gelato shops. SLIDESHOW

from The Guardian (London UK)
San Francisco’s best bets for budget lodging. Heavy on hostels, B&B’s and small European-style hotels.

from the Los Angeles Times
Mexico’s beach resort city of Cancun boasts one of the world’s more unusual museums. To visit it, you’ll need a swimsuit and a snorkel.

ASIA/PACIFIC
from the New York Times
It happens every summer of the coast of northern China. A massive bloom of algae turns a stretch of beach the size of Connecticut into something that looks like a floating soccer pitch. Floating…and stinking.

from Travel Weekly
A new generation of cruise ships is taking to the Yangtze River — more spacious and with more amenities. But old-timers who remember the river’s towering cliffs before the building of the controversial Three Gorges Dam will tell you it’s just not the same.

from the Washington Post
The resurgence of tourism in Cambodia could hardly have a more symbolic example than this: A tract of land once sown with landmines by the Khmer Rouge is now the site of new luxury resort.

EUROPE
from the New York Times
These days, there are more reasons to visit Northern Ireland than to satisfy your fan-lust for HBO’s Game of Thrones.

from the Toronto Sun
The good news: A medieval tower offering stunning views of Paris opens to the public for the first time. The bad news: The climb up the stairs may take your breath away before the view does.

Spotted something you’d like to see in the next IBIT Travel Digest? Send me a message using the handy form below:
[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.
*